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preexisting protein in urine?

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preexisting protein in urine?

Postby expert@preeclampsia.org » Tue Feb 20, 2007 07:26 pm

by expert@preeclampsia.org (322 Posts), Tue Feb 20, 2007 07:26 pm

My husband and I are wanting to start a family, but I have one concern.

I have had urine tests every 6 months for the last 8 years, as I have a higher then normal amount of protein in my urine.

My GP thinks there will not be any problems with pre-e, but advises that the hospital & staff know of the protein my body seems to release.

Do you think this could be an issue when I fall pregnant? Do I have a higher chance of pr-e?

Thank you kindly.
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Re : preexisting protein in urine?

Postby expert@preeclampsia.org » Tue Feb 20, 2007 07:28 pm

by expert@preeclampsia.org (322 Posts), Tue Feb 20, 2007 07:28 pm

The information needed here is has the patient been evaluated by a nephrologist to determine if she in fact has an underlying disease, and if so can we identify it even if the disease appears clinically quite quiescent.

In most cases when an underlying disorder is present, a pregnancy will proceed uneventfully if the women’s blood pressure is normal and her kidney function at most only minimally compromised. However women with underlying kidney disease do have a higher chance of developing preeclampsia (where as the normal incidence is 3-7% ,theirs being 15-20%, but again only a small percentage of the preeclamptics manifest severe disease.)

The take home message: Even when pregnancy is not contemplated one should attempt to establish a diagnosis long before it reaches an advanced phase (re the possible availability of therapy to cure it or impede deterioration). Secondly, pregnancy is usually successful if hypertension is absent and renal function near normal. Such gestations should be overseen by specialists in high risk pregnancy. Finally, there are a few specific kidney disorders where the prognosis is worse then that made in the preceding sentences, so again it is best to have a renal specialist attempt to establish a definitive diagnosis.

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