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hyperthyroid? hypothyroid? and PE

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hyperthyroid? hypothyroid? and PE

Postby expert@preeclampsia.org » Mon Aug 28, 2006 03:15 pm

by expert@preeclampsia.org (322 Posts), Mon Aug 28, 2006 03:15 pm

Hyperthyroid

I was diagnonsed Hyperthyroid few months ago. My PCP started me on beta blockers. My concerns are:

1. Is there any link between PE and hyperthyroidism?

2. Do beta blockers decrease synthesis of thyroid hormones ? Or Do beta blockers just antagonize the effects of thyroid hormones? My T3,T4 levels came down while on beta blockers ..my doc says it may be due to beta blocker..I am totally confuse here.

3. Can hyperthyroidism be pulsatile? Means it happens for some time then corrects itself and then happens again...? My doc said ..it can be like this...this would be worse if it is linked to PE.

Hypothyroid

I am a new member and had pre-eclampsia with my daughter in April 2003, I was 34 weeks. At the time I did not fit into any of the categories most women do who are diagnosed with pre-eclampsia. Now I have been taking Amour thyroid for hypothyroidism. I did read an article somewhere that linked hypothyroidism and pre-eclampsia. I was wondering if you could shed some light as if hypothyroidism is know to cause pre-eclampsia. My husband and I have decided to not have another child due to my horrifing birthing experience.
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Re : hyperthyroid? hypothyroid? and PE

Postby expert@preeclampsia.org » Mon Aug 28, 2006 03:16 pm

by expert@preeclampsia.org (322 Posts), Mon Aug 28, 2006 03:16 pm

Hyperthyroidism is a substantial risk factor for preeclampsia. (It is also a risk for spontaneous preterm labor). This is particularly true when it is not controlled. Thyroid hormone circulates as T3 and T4. T3 is the active hormone, and a ß-blocker blocks the conversion from T3 to T4. The ß-blocker also blocks the effects of hyperthyroidism. To decrease the production of T4, a drug such as PTU (propylthiouracil) is frequently prescribed. Sometimes radioactive iodine is used to treat the thyroid. PTU can be used in pregnancy. Radioactive iodine cannot be used in pregnancy. Hyperthyroidism should always be definitively treated before pregnancy.

Hyperthyroidism is one of the most treatable conditions where treatment has a very positive impact on pregnancy outcome.

Hypothyroidism is also a risk for preeclampsia. The magnitude of risk is not as great as for hyperthyroidism. Many women with hypothyroidism were previously hyperthyroid due to autoimmune thyroiditis. At first the inflammation associated with the autoimmmunity stimulates the glad to release thyroid hormone. Over time, it destroys the thyroid so that replacement is needed.

Hypothyroidism should be aggressively treated in pregnancy. There is some indication that a small reduction in thyroid hormone can affect brain development.
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