Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

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leftcoastgirl
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Re : Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby leftcoastgirl » Fri Jun 29, 2007 01:55 am

Interesting. I had sleep apnea and corrective surgery for it after my second child was born (and second pre-e pregnancy). I still snore but no longer have apnea. Was the most painful thing i've ever been through in my life though, owwwwwww! Another thing going for me in this pregnancy, no apnea (hey, i'll take all the optimism I can get) =).

frumiousb
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Re : Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby frumiousb » Wed Jun 27, 2007 02:59 am

Hi Rosemary,

Thanks for this. Last time I only got it during pregnancy. Holland is a little bit different about how you can get to specialists, but I know my MFM/peri are open to the idea that it could have been a factor, so I think that they will support me if it starts up again.

Cheryl

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rosemary
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Re : Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby rosemary » Mon Jun 25, 2007 11:40 pm

Cheryl, If you are still having snoring issues, as a suggestion see a sleep specialist. I was diagnosed a few months ago with severe sleep apnea. During my last pregnancy, my sleep was so poor that I spoke to my OB about it. She then sent me to my PCP, who literally dismissed me - telling me "you don't have sleep apnea and a sleep study is just a waste of time". Four days later, I developed PE/HELLP. That was 3 years ago. After 3 more years of pure misery, I found a specialist and had a sleep study. A month ago I had surgery to remove my tonsils, adenoids, uvula & partial soft palate and sinus tissue. While it was a painful surgery and recovery, and I am still healing, for the first time in years I am sleeping and waking up relatively rested. As Karen mentioned, CPAP is an alternative to a surgical procedure and especially if the apnea is pregnancy related. I chose surgery because I was a good candidate and I didn't tollerate the CPAP well.

frumiousb
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Re : Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby frumiousb » Tue Jun 12, 2007 11:05 pm

Took this question to my MFM, and she said that they were following the research with interest, but that it was too soon to imply a treatment based on the work that they'd done...

Which was kind of the answer that I expected.

Still.

Cheryl

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caryn
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Re : Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby caryn » Thu May 31, 2007 04:03 pm

There's been some recent speculation that for those who develop sleep apnea, a CPAP might help keep you oxygenated, hence keep the placenta from becoming hypoxic and releasing the soluble factors that have recently been implicated in PE...

My DH says I was snoring, but doesn't have any idea when it started. And I was asleep, and don't know either. [:D]

It will be interesting to see the followup research on this.

frumiousb
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Re : Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby frumiousb » Mon May 28, 2007 04:56 am

This makes me really curious, since as a kid I suffered from sleep apnea pretty badly. So badly that I was on medication for it. After I got pregnant the last time, I started snoring immediately. Really really badly. So badly that I wondered if the apnea was coming back. Didn't think anything more about it.

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caryn
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Sleep Apnea Raises Pregnancy Complication Risk

Postby caryn » Mon May 28, 2007 02:22 am

"Pregnant women who have disordered breathing patterns during sleep may be at elevated risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure -- including eclampsia and pre-eclampsia..."

http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ATS/tb/5759

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