Getting Your Whole Family Active

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By Quincy Fleming ~ Physical activity is something that my husband and I have always enjoyed, so it is only natural that my children have also gravitated towards endurance sports. It takes a lot of time and creative scheduling to get workouts in, but instead of trying to keep the workouts and family time separate, we find all kinds of crazy ways to include our two children. In fact, my husband and I are currently training for an Iron Distance Triathlon. Why, you might ask?

My children and I are preeclampsia survivors. And while we are lucky to have escaped with our lives, our health, our sanity, I know that we are at a heightened risk for heart disease, diabetes, obesity. It seems every lifestyle disease out there carries an extra punch for us. So we asked ourselves: why not embrace healthy lifestyles and exercise as part of our everyday family time?

Unfortunately, because the life that includes raising small children is demanding and time consuming, physical activity often becomes viewed as an adult selfishness to be discarded in favor of doing "more important" things for our children. But taking care of yourself IS doing something for the children. And more importantly, is setting an example for your children.

So from our active family to yours, here are some strategies to get the whole family moving:

1. Go somewhere fun for the kids and have Mommy and Daddy take turns getting in a workout. Summers at the beach is a great opportunity: one of us will start out with the kids building sandcastles and playing in the waves, while the other one goes for a swim, bike, or run, then switch. And be sure to remember to spend some time together, too!

2. Plan a day trip or vacation around physical activity. I am not suggesting you take the kids biking in the Alps here. (Actually, I am... that would be awesome! Can I come along?) But you could definitely tour a place by walking or biking, or, incorporating physical activities into your trip. I am all for relaxing. And eating. But I try to keep it in smaller proportion to moving.

3. Move together.
Take the stairs, park far away, walk somewhere you would normally drive. Put on some music and dance. Go to the school playground and shoot some hoops. Or kick it with a soccer ball. Toss a football around. Play tag. Roll down a hill. Take a flashlight out and do a nighttime walk. Have underwater tea parties at the pool. It doesn't have to be earth shattering or a monster workout. Just do something that makes you move more than you normally would: because it beats sitting on the couch!

4. Compete. Play games with your kids and don't always let them win. Encourage them to try to be the best at something. Kids are awesomely egotistical and competitive. They are actually kind of fun and funny this way. Enjoy it, feed off of it a bit, because trust me, they will LOVE it!

5. Sign up. Most kids can run/walk a 5k...so can most adults. If they are too little to run/walk, they can ride in a stroller... so why not sign the family up for a family race? Many events have themes, support and post-race activities and are geared towards families (including your local Promise Walk for Preeclampsia!). Even if your 7 year old complained the whole time, he will proudly proclaim he has run a 5k once the race is over. And for the rest of their lives, they will know they can do it and will be much more likely to do it again.

I'm not encouraging everyone to run out and sign up for some crazy endurance event (leave that to me). But I am encouraging you all to get out with your families and MOVE a little bit. Walk, run, swim, bowl, dance, jump, climb, whatever gets you active. And whatever it is, do it together!

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