NICHD Research Study Wraps Up

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Several years ago, Dr. Jun “Jim” Zhang, a senior investigator at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development approached the Preeclampsia Foundation about working together on an epidemiological research study. Here was the study’s rationale:

“Preeclampsia is a syndrome of hypertension accompanied by proteinuria. It is a major pregnancy complication, associated with premature delivery, fetal growth restriction, abruptio placentae, and fetal death, as well as maternal morbidity and mortality. Although preeclampsia has been recognized for centuries, the etiology of this disorder remains unknown. Familial clustering of preeclampsia has long been identified, leading to the concept of a genetic basis for this syndrome. We propose a familial genetic study of preeclampsia. As such a study is often difficult to do, we plan to conduct a pilot study to test the feasibility, logistics and examine frequency of genetic polymorphism of certain genes in the target population.”

A total of 60 women who had preeclampsia during their first pregnancy were identified through the Preeclampsia Foundation. Women who had chronic hypertension or diabetes prior to the first pregnancy were excluded. We also tried to enroll their family members in the study. All subjects were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire and collect mouth wash samples, in order to collect the buccal cells from which DNA was extracted. Women who reported having hypertension during pregnancy were also asked to sign a medical record release form, and a copy of their medical record was obtained to confirm the diagnosis of preeclampsia.

Forty-six women returned the questionnaires and samples, resulting in a 77% participation rate – a very high response for research studies. The actual enrollment rates for the biological mother, father, mother-in-law, and father-in-law ranged between 61% and 26%; and the actual enrollment rates for full sisters, brothers-in-law, full brothers and sisters-in-law ranged between 23% and 36%.

“Thus,” concluded the abstract, “conducting a familial genetic epidemiologic study with self-administering questionnaires, mouthwash and buccal swabs is feasible. However, strategies for increasing participation rates among family members are warranted.”

We concluded the collection process in early 2006, and the resulting abstract was submitted to the International Society for Studies on Hypertension in Pregnancy and the Society for Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology annual meetings. Our Study Managers, Anne Garrett and Carrie Barrion, presented the poster at the latter meeting.

 

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