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The Link Between Preeclampsia and Heart Disease

Last Updated on Wednesday, May 21, 2014

By Beth Battaglino, RN, CEO of HealthyWomen

You may think of preeclampsia as high blood pressure that occurs during or immediately after pregnancy. That’s simply not the case. Preeclampsia can occur up to six weeks postpartum.

And that’s not all: Research is finding that preeclampsia appears to be a significant warning sign for heart disease after pregnancy. In fact, the American Heart Association’s guidelines on cardiovascular disease in women consider preeclampsia as strong a risk factor for heart disease as a failed stress test—a test commonly used to identify existing heart disease.

Recognizing this important risk factor is vital to women’s heart health because heart disease is the leading cause of death in women in the United States.

Medical researchers do not yet know exactly how or why preeclampsia and future heart disease are linked, but they do know:

  1. A history of preeclampsia doubles the risk of heart attack, stroke and blood clots within 5 to 15 years after pregnancy.
  2. Women who have repeat or severe preeclampsia or preeclampsia accompanied by stillbirth are at greater risk of heart disease than women who have high blood pressure only or preeclampsia during a single pregnancy.
  3. Many women may not be aware that preeclampsia and other pregnancy complications can signal heart disease risk. A study found that 13 percent of women screened for heart disease risk factors during an OB/GYN visit had three or more cardiovascular disease risk factors they were not aware of.

If you have ever had preeclampsia, it is vital your primary care doctor is aware of your heart disease risk factor. Your health care professional can help you determine next steps for your heart health.

In the meantime, take good care of your ticker by following these 5 steps to a heart-
healthy diet.

Beth Battaglino, RN
President & CEO, HealthyWomen
Beth Battaglino, RN, brings a unique combination of sharp business expertise and, as a practicing registered nurse, medical knowledge to her role as President and CEO of HealthyWomen, a non-profit organization providing women with in-depth, objective, medically-approved information on a broad range of women's health issues. Beth has worked in the healthcare industry for nearly 20 years, helping to define and drive public education programs on a broad range of women's health issues.


We’ll be Speaking Here

International Society for the study of Hypertension in Pregnancy
October 23, 2016
San Paulo, Brazil


Mississippi Perinatal Quality Collaborative
October 24, 2016
Illinois Perinatal Quality Collaborative Annual Meeting
November 3, 2016
Lombard, IL
Florida Perinatal Quality Collaborative
Preeclampsia Experts - Florida Road Tour
November 8-10, 2016
Multiple Florida Locations
Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses
November 17, 2016
Monroe Township, New Jersey
Grand Rounds, University of Miami
December 15, 2016
Miami, Florida

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Preeclampsia RT @Eleni_Z_Tsigas: This suggests that keeping yourself healthy post-Preeclampsia may improve your risk for CVD. @ISSHP1 https://t.co/v0kgq
Preeclampsia RT @Eleni_Z_Tsigas: Nice to see many women leaders as we kick off biennial World Congress @ISSHP1 https://t.co/oP0OpEH62e
Preeclampsia RT @AHatUWS: @ISSHP1 patient information in USA shown as a strong reversible factor to improve outcomes #hypertension#pregnancy

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