• Bookmark and Share

Patient-Centered Care Improves Preeclampsia Outcomes

Last Updated on Tuesday, October 02, 2012

By Dr. Linda Burke-Galloway ~ October is Patient Centric Care Month, a term you will likely see more of as our healthcare system moves further into the 21st century. What does 21st century healthcare look like? It means that all of your records will be computerized and not on paper. It means that you will receive your "chart" on a flash drive so that when if you leave your physician's office and go to a hospital, your health records remain with you. Gone will be the days when your labs will have to be repeated because no one can locate your prenatal chart. Repeating labs is not only annoying, it's costly.

"Patient Centric Care" means that the emphasis will no longer center on your physician. Or a hospital. Or an ambulatory care center. It will be centered on you, the patient. Why? Because at the end of the day, if you're not well, if the outcome was less than expected, then the system has failed. The $2.3 trillion dollars spent each year on healthcare has not provided a "return" for its investment.

Traditionally, the physician or healthcare provider was looked upon as an authority, but you, the patient, have now taken center stage. Under patient-centric care, healthcare providers will function more like coaches and you, as the patient, will be expected to become more involved in your care. For a pregnant mom, this is critical. Gone will be the days of physicians "rushing through patients," barely listening to the fetal heartbeats and missing important clues that could compromise your care. Why? Because of the use of electronic medical records and the new system of "pay for performance." The electronic medical records have safety measures programmed into its system making it difficult for doctors to miss important red flags. Physicians will not be paid based on their number of office visits but by the outcome of the patient. Did the care provided by the physician improve the patient's health? That is the basis by which they will be paid.

One of the main reasons for missing a diagnosis of preeclampsia is that someone is not paying attention. Somewhere during the course of your care, someone drops the ball. The blood pressure that has been creeping up for the past 2 visits is not addressed. The protein in the urine ignored. The 5-pound weight gain in one week overlooked. The new complaint of a headache not heard. Unfortunately preeclampsia does not always present in textbook-fashion in the manner that we were taught in medical school. It has many disguises and there must be a high index of suspicion for those disguises to be recognized.

In business, there is something called a "butterfly effect" where one "small" missed detail can cause big problems. The same principle can be applied to medicine. When a "small" risk factor of a patient is overlooked, it places her in harm's way. Women who are pregnant for the first time, especially those who are under 18 and over 35, are at risk for preeclampsia. All African American women are at risk. Women who have a history of hypertension are at risk. All of these patients should be duly informed at their first prenatal visit of the potential for developing preeclampsia. The purpose is not to alarm but to inform.

Patient-Centric-Care Month is a time for celebration. The patient has finally returned to center stage. Although long overdue, better late than never.

Linda Burke-Galloway, MD, MS, FACOG, is the author of The Smart Mother's Guide to a Better Pregnancy, one of the Top 3 books in our Report on Pregnancy Guidebooks. She is also an Ob-Gyn Patient Safety and Risk Management Expert.

UPCOMING EVENTS

We’ll be Speaking Here

Preeclampsia in the News

Featured Video

What’s Happening on Twitter

Preeclampsia A bit of lighthearted fun for our supporters who have or are celebrating Christmas with a baby or toddler... can... http://t.co/iraUxW9wYM
21mreplyretweetfavorite
Preeclampsia #WhenIWish: Anthony F. thought his daughter Ella's premature birth was the end of their family's pregnancy... http://t.co/f2FaQzqMCv
Preeclampsia @HopeforWCB Awesome work! Would love to learn more (send via PM or to info@preeclampsia.org). @UBCPreEMPT has a mobile project as well.

Press Releases by Year

Other Resources

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST. We respect your privacy.