One mother’s tragic death alerts another mom about dangerous postpartum complications

Post On Friday, November 30, 2018 By Debbie Helton

One mother’s tragic death alerts another mom about dangerous postpartum complications

“I just had this feeling like, ‘If I go to sleep, I’m not going to wake up.” – Marie McCausland

One mother’s tragic death alerts another mom about dangerous postpartum complications

When Lauren Bloomstein found out she was pregnant, she was absolutely thrilled. A nurse in her hospital’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Lauren had always loved babies. “The prospect of becoming a mother made her giddy,” said her husband Larry. “Lauren was the happiest and most alive I’d ever seen her.”  

After a smooth pregnancy, Lauren had a scheduled induction and delivered daughter Hallie. Within hours, Lauren started to experience excruciating abdominal pain and rising blood pressure that were dismissed by staff as normal.  Her condition continued to deteriorate and 24 hours later, Lauren died from complications of postpartum preeclampsia while still in the hospital.

Bloomstein

Larry was left to pick up the pieces with Hallie after this devastating loss. He contacted the Preeclampsia Foundation for support, determined to do something so this doesn’t happen to another family. To raise awareness about the danger of postpartum preeclampsia, we facilitated an interview for Larry with ProPublica and NPR for a “Lost Mothers” series. The national article referenced Lauren’s symptoms and the importance of advocating for yourself and your loved ones when healthcare providers don’t listen to your concerns.

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Marie McCausland read that article with particular attention because she was days away from giving birth herself. Marie went on to deliver her first child, a boy, and was discharged from the hospital with no information on possible postpartum complications. Four days after giving birth, Marie started to have symptoms at home and recognized them as being similar to those experienced by Lauren.

“I just had this feeling like, ‘If I go to sleep, I’m not going to wake up,’” says Marie. She and her husband and four-day-old baby immediately went to the hospital’s Emergency Department, where doctors initially dismissed her symptoms.

Knowing of Lauren’s fate, Marie didn’t take no for an answer and pushed the doctors to test for preeclampsia. That’s when she was diagnosed with severe preeclampsia and received treatment that saved her life.

Marie credits Lauren’s tragic story with saving her life, and she wants to raise awareness for other moms. A few months after her near-death experience, Marie contacted her hospital, pushing them to improve its discharge protocol. Thanks to Marie, the hospital updated its discharge instructions to include a list of potentially dangerous postpartum symptoms, so new mothers know what to look for.

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Now an active advocate with the Preeclampsia Foundation, Marie joins us in asking for your support. Please help us create a brighter future for families by making a gift to the Preeclampsia Foundation.

Moms and babies are depending on us – and we’re depending on you. As we enter the season of giving, your year-end gift will guarantee that we can continue to move forward with our shared mission.

Give the gift of life today! Visit: http://bit.ly/pf2-give

As the nation’s only patient advocacy organization dedicated to preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome, moms and babies are depending on us to save them from these hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Your generosity helps us advocate for policies and practices to prevent maternal and infant deaths and illnesses, educate and support our community, and fund research to find a cure.

Give like the lives of moms and babies depend on it. Because they do.

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